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Event Analysis – MCS 13 - Geminis

Introduction

Hello! My name is Luke Tyler and I’m a Top Player Council member alongside the assigned Gemini Expert in the discord. I recently finished in the Top 4 of MCS 13 using a Gemini deck. The following will be a tournament report of my experience and why I built the deck as I did. I originally planned to include my tournament report in the guide simultaneously to its updating, but with a banlist imminent it made sense to hold off on updating the guide until such occurs. 


Tournament Decklist

skillBalance
Duel Links Card: Dark%20Valkyria
Duel Links Card: Dark%20Valkyria
Duel Links Card: Dark%20Valkyria
Duel Links Card: Evocator%20Chevalier
Duel Links Card: Evocator%20Chevalier
Duel Links Card: Evocator%20Chevalier
Duel Links Card: Heavy%20Knight%20of%20the%20Flame
Duel Links Card: Heavy%20Knight%20of%20the%20Flame
Duel Links Card: Gemini%20Spark
Duel Links Card: Gemini%20Spark
Duel Links Card: Gemini%20Spark
Duel Links Card: Supervise
Duel Links Card: Supervise
Duel Links Card: Supervise
Duel Links Card: Mirror%20Wall
Duel Links Card: Mirror%20Wall
Duel Links Card: Paleozoic%20Canadia
Duel Links Card: Paleozoic%20Canadia
Duel Links Card: Treacherous%20Trap%20Hole
Duel Links Card: Treacherous%20Trap%20Hole

Side Deck:

Duel Links Card: DNA%20Surgery
Duel Links Card: DNA%20Surgery
Duel Links Card: DNA%20Surgery
Duel Links Card: Magic%20Deflector
Duel Links Card: Magic%20Deflector


Deck Decision

In the current tournament format with side deck, I felt like Geminis were a good pick. This is because every represented deck in the format either doesn’t have an easy time beating Gemini or heavily fears DNA Surgery. Hey, Trunade! was a fear of mine - hence as to why I side decked Magic Deflector.

There are quite a few ways in which you can choose to construct a Gemini deck. However, I decided that Balance was the skill to play with the provided consistency being too valuable.

Through testing I also came to the personal conclusion that the number of monsters added to the number of revival traps in a Pure Gemini deck should total 8. This is because you don’t want too many monsters clogging your hands but you want enough so that you are able to topdeck them when you are on the back-foot. This is a decision of mine that could definitely change in the future as the pace of the game shifts. 

So with the above in mind, I decided to play 8 monsters with only 6 traps (no Birthright) - this was because I wanted to abuse Treacherous Trap Hole, considering how it can still steal games. Having a third of my trap lineup be Treacherous Trap Hole meant that Balance would give me the card quite often. To account the instances in which I did not open Treacherous Trap Hole, the other 4 traps in my deck needed to compliment the use of the card to limit the odds of it being a dead draw late game. This made playing at least 2 Paleozoic Canadia a no-brainer when taking it’s graveyard recursive ability into consideration. For the remaining 2 trap cards in my deck I chose to use 2 copies of Mirror Wall.

Why Mirror Wall

In further regards to Mirror Wall, there were 4 main reasons as to why I chose to use it. It is resilient to mass backrow removal cards such as Hey, Trunade! and Xing Zhen Hu, it lets Dark Valkyria and Evocator Chevalier survive many Paleozoic Canadia plays, it is a semi-continuous trap (granting synergetic Treacherous Trap Hole applications) and it is Damage Step removal.


Matchups

Hero matchup

  • Played 6
  • Won 5

The way that I would advise playing against Masked Heroes is to try and gauge how many battle traps they have. Early in the game I tend to make the decision of whether dealing with their battle traps in your current state would deplete you of too many resources or not. If the answer to that question is yes, then it is likely best to play the waiting game. Chances are that you will typically draw into the ability to remove enough of their backrow before they draw enough Mask Changes. When side decking, I replaced both Treacherous Trap Hole with Magic Deflectors in anticipation of backrow removal coming in.

Blue-Eyes matchup

  • Played 3
  • Won 2

I’d say this matchup is completely subjective to the backrow that you choose to play. With the backrow that I opted to use I’d say that I had a slightly favoured Blue-Eyes matchup. Canadia isn’t too great against their big monsters when they have access to bringing out multiple, but being able to deny one of their backrow interceptors like Breaker the Magical Warrior can be quite nice. Considering that my trap cards were already quite good against Blue-Eyes, I chose not to side deck for the matchup and reserve my side deck slots to combat issues like Bujin, Hey, Trunade! and Spellbooks

Vampire matchup

  • Played 2
  • Won 2

With the exception of an early Hey, Trunade! I’d say that the Vampire matchup is in the favour of Geminis. By getting a boost from Vampire Kingdom, Heavy Knight of the Flame puts the pressure on them to bring out their bigger monsters. The main threat seemed to be Hey, Trunade! and because of that I brought in 2 copies of Magic Deflector to replace both copies of Treacherous Trap Hole when side decking.


Thanks to the people cheering me on in the tournament, and to my teammates on Animal Plays for helping me test.


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